Standing guard

“They conjure images of hideous, brooding creatures perched high above the cities and villages of the world. The most terrifying ones look as though they might break from their stone moorings and take flight. But gargoyles, it turns out, are full of surprises. Read on to learn the origin of their name, their very functional purpose, and what makes a gargoyle different from a grotesque.

THEY SERVE A PRACTICAL PURPOSE.
When gargoyles began appearing on churches throughout Europe in the 13th century, they served as decorative water spouts, engineered to preserve stone walls by diverting the flow of rainwater outward from rooftops. This function, technically speaking, distinguishes gargoyles from other stone beasts like grotesques and bosses, although these days the term encompasses all sorts of decorative creature carvings.

THEY WERE MEANT TO INSPIRE FEAR IN PARISHIONERS
Because most Medieval Europeans were illiterate, the clergy needed visual representations of the horrors of hell to drive people to the sanctuary of the church. Placing gargoyles on the building’s exterior reinforced the idea that evil dwelt outside the church, while salvation dwelt within. "How better to enforce church attendance and docility than by providing a daily reminder of the horrors to come," wrote Gary Varner in his book, Gargoyles, Grotesques and Green Men: Ancient Symbolism in European and American Architecture.

THEY ALSO BROUGHT PAGANS TO CHURCH.
Churches would also model gargoyles after the creatures worshipped by pagan tribes, thinking this would make their houses of worship appear more welcoming to them. It was a bit of clever marketing that worked, according to scholar Darlene Trew Crist. "Churches grew in number and influence as the pagan belief system and many of its images were absorbed into Christianity," she wrote in American Gargoyles: Spirits in Stone.

NOTRE DAME’S GARGOYLES ARE FAIRLY RECENT CREATIONS.
The world’s most famous gargoyles, and the ones that most influenced the popular wings-and-horns image of the creatures, are found on Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral. Although the cathedral was constructed in the 13th century, the gargoyles were part of an extensive restoration project in the mid 1800s. Conceived by architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc and sculptor Victor Pyanet, the gargoyles have little in common with Medieval gargoyles, scholars contend, and were intended to represent the time period rather than recreate it.”

Source: mentalfloss.com/article/88019/10-fearsome-facts-about-gar…

This crazy evil building was discovered at Flickr by user peterclifford1 . Original date: 2018-10-13 14:06:18

Tagged: , Notre Dame , steeple , XF50 , Fujifilm X-T2 , Fuji , grotesque , monochrome , b&w , black and white , tourism , tourist , religion , Catholic , church , France , Paris , architecture , Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris , Victor Hugo , cathedral , Notre-Dame Cathedral , gargoyle , gargoyles

You again!

The 56-storey Tour Montparnasse again doing what it does best – rearing its ugly head and ruining an otherwise elegant Paris cityscape, representing all that is evil about 20th Century architecture.

Nah! Honestly, I still don’t think it’s that bad a skyscraper. Sure, it’s inappropriate for the city centre of Paris, and it sticks out like a sore thumb, but still – at least it doesn’t melt cars like our tall buildings do in Britain! Taken on 27 March 2012.

This dark evil building was spotted on Flickr by user yon_willis . Original date: 2014-01-10 02:22:56

Tagged: , Paris , Île-de-France , France , 2012 , Le dôme des Invalides , Les Invalides , Tour Montparnasse , 7e arrondissement , Cathédrale Américaine de Paris , Europe , Observation Deck , Skyscraper , Dusk , Dome , American Cathedral in Paris , Spire , Skyline , Cityscape

Paroisse Cathédrale Saint Sauveur, Aix-en-Provence

Place des Martyrs-de-la-Résistance, Aix-en-Provence, Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, France

Aix Cathedral in Aix-en-Provence in southern France is a Roman Catholic cathedral and the seat of the Archbishop of Aix. It is built on the site of the 1st century Roman forum of Aix. Built and re-built from the 12th until the 19th century, it includes Romanesque, Gothic and Neo-Gothic elements, as well as Roman columns and parts of the baptistery from a 6th-century Christian church. It’s a national monument of France.

The original Romanesque front of Saint Mary’s nave was destroyed in the 15th century, and replaced with a new Gothic front and a bell tower.
The façade features four statues by Jean Mone, made in 1512-1513, on the middle level: Saint Mitre (carrying his head); Saint Mary Magdalene, (carrying a flask of perfume); the boy-bishop Saint Louis of Toulouse (d. 1297), the brother of Robert of Naples, Count of Provence 1309-43; and the other Saint Louis, King Louis IX of France (d. 1270), his great-uncle.
Jacotin Paproche, from Picardy, sculpted the ten small prophets and twenty cherubim (1484) on the façade. Pierre Souquet created the two statues on the upper level, representing the first two bishops of Aix, traditionally named as Maximinus and Sidonius.
The centrepiece of the façade is Saint Michael Crushing the Dragon (1507), by Jean Paumier, from Burgundy.
The façade originally also included twelve statues of the apostles and six statues on the tympanum, which were destroyed during the French Revolution.

Carved doors
The doors of the cathedral were commissioned by the chapter in 1505, and were carved of walnut by the brothers Raymond and Jean Bolhit of Aix and by the Toulon sculptor Jean Guiramand.
The doors feature four figures in high relief of the major prophets of the Old Testament (Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel and Jeremiah).
Above the prophets are the figures of twelve Sybils, pagan fortune-tellers from antiquity, honoured by medieval Christian scholars for having forecast the birth, death and resurrection of Christ.
The figures are framed with garlands of pomegranates and acorns, bunches of grapes, symbols of the Eucharist, a lion, a dragon and other fantastic animals: an aspic (another type of dragon) and a basilisk, a cock with the tail of a snake, representing the battle between good and evil.

Discovered on Flickr (andbog ) for this cool evil building. Original date: 2015-05-20 09:51:16

Tagged: , sony , alpha , Ilce , a6000 , sony a 6000 , e mount , mirrorless , csc , Sony a , oss , sel , 16-50mm , Aix en Provence , provence , provenza , france , francia , fr , church , SEL-P1650 , Bouches-du-Rhône , Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur , chiesa , facade , façade , architettura , architecture , Sony α , Sony Alpha , SONY ⍺6000 , SONY ILCE-6000 , SONY alpha 6000 , ⍺6000 , ILCE-6000 , Aps-c

Garden and Baskets in Carcassonne, France

The Barefoot Books Ambassador Conference 2013: Day Trip To Carcassonne

This terrifying evil building was seen on Flickr by user MarketingBarefoot . Original date: 2013-05-15 15:50:18

Tagged: , Barefoot , Books , Ambassador , Day , Trip , Carcassonne , France , Castle , Tour , Mid , Evil , Town , French , Countryside

Abbaye de Sylvanès

Pons de l’Héras, a knight and brigand, renounced all evil, joined the Order of Cistercians and founded this abbey in 1132.
Following the Cistercian "tradition", the place was "in the middle of nowhere". For a short time, the abbey prospered, but life was not easy here. After the Hundred Years War, the abbey´s economic declined rapidly and from 1477 on was under Commende, run by secular priests.

After the French Revolution the very last monks fled – and the buildings were sold as National Property. Prosper Mérimée listed the ensemble already 1854, but that did not help. Most buildings got demolished. The remaining structures were used as barns, the church was used by the parish. The "rediscovery" started in 1969/1970, when two Dominican monks found out about the exceptional acoustic of the church. Since then many things changed. The renovation got underway, an organ got installed – and now this is a renowned center for "sacred music".

The abbey has in interesting website (in French):
www.sylvanes.com/

Credit goes to Flickr (Martin M. Miles ) for this mind blowing evil building. Original date: 2012-05-15 09:07:09

Tagged: , Abbaye de Sylvanès , Pons de l’Héras , Hundred Years War , French Revolution , Prosper Mérimée , sacred music , Midi-Pyrénées , Aveyron , 12 , France , Cistercians

Village wall in Carcassonne France

The Barefoot Books Ambassador Conference 2013: Day Trip To Carcassonne

Discovered on Flickr (MarketingBarefoot ) for this terrifying evil building. Original date: 2013-05-15 15:50:18

Tagged: , Barefoot , Books , Ambassador , Day , Trip , Carcassonne , France , Castle , Tour , Mid , Evil , Town , French , Countryside

2008-10-10 Melle, église St Pierre, Deux-Sévres, Poitou-Charentes

St. Peter’s Church in Melle.
The church Saint-Pierre was built in ocher limestone in the early XII century on the site of a chapel built in 950 of the abbey of Saint-Maixent. This first church was surrounded by a Carolingian cemetery.
The church was restored between 1965 and 1966 and found new windows and a new roof.
It is classified as a historical monument since 1862
The plan of the church is very simple: a large ship leads to a transept arm cuisine open two chapels. Recent support from each of the central apse apse. The transept is surmounted by a square tower, pierced with four small bays and covered with a pyramidal roof dates from 1466.
The outside
The western facade is very simple, but it has an apse chapels and ornate, including windows archivolts which are covered with an abundance of geometric patterns.
The southern flank provides a lateral portal whose arches house the animals of the Apocalypse and the signs of the zodiac. It is surmounted by a niche with a maimed statue of Christ surrounded by the Holy Virgin and St. John.
Between the gate and the niche is a cornice supported by corbels depicting centaurs, the paschal lamb, the symbols of the evangelists …
The sanctuary is also highly decorated. Each window is decorated with original designs: stars, bats, diamond, palmettes, cylinders and under the cornice, human masks, animal heads. One of the capitals of the windows are decorated with two peacocks do cartwheels.
Within
The ship is divided into three naves with vaulted rock broken (quite rare) and divided into five bays by eight pillars. These consist of four columns flanked by four columns, two of the most beautiful capitals are the Entombment of Christ and the spine Shooter (Shooter The theme of the spine was popular among pilgrims, walkers so exposed to this adversity and that their pilgrimage to eradicate evil from the body). Other capitals are several reasons: a bearded mask, an angel, two birds facing two chimeras, a griffin.
The cross is surmounted by an octagonal dome in the wrong.
In the pavement of the church ship there are several gravestones XVIII century.

As seen on Flickr (ellapronkraft. ) for this weird evil building. Original date: 2011-08-30 13:02:31

Tagged: , ‘Melle’ , église Saint-Pierre , ‘Deux-Sèvres’ , ‘France’ , ‘art-romanesque’ , ‘art-roman’ , ‘middle-ages’ , ‘moyen-Age’

Noyers-sur-Cher (Loir-et-Cher)

Chapelle Saint-Lazare (12e siècle).
47°16’33.68"N
1°23’9.56"E

Comme beaucoup de chapelles dédiées à Saint Lazare, cet édifice faisait partie d’une léproserie au XIIème siècle.
La présence d’une léproserie, ou maladrerie, à cet endroit, sur une voie de navigation terrestre et fluviale est logique.
Le bacille de la lèpre, ou bacille de Hansen, a fait des ravages partout où les échanges ont mis en contact des malades itinérants et les populations locales.
L’isolement des individus reconnus porteurs du mal était une nécessité.

Chapelle Saint-Lazare (12th century).

Like many chapel dedicated to Saint Lazare, this building was part of a leper hospital in the twelfth century.
The presence of a leprosarium, or lazar at this point on a waterway land and river is logical.
The bacillus of leprosy, or Hansen’s bacillus, has wreaked havoc wherever trade has made ​​contact with sick homeless and local populations.
The isolation of individuals known bearers of evil was a necessity.

This amazing evil building was spotted on Flickr by user sybarite48 . Original date: 2012-08-30 17:48:01

Tagged: , Noyers-sur-Cher , Loir-et-Cher , France , chapelle , chapel , Kapelle , كنيسة صغيرة , 教堂 , capilla , παρεκκλήσι , cappella , チャペル , kapel , kaplica , capela , часовня , şapel , Chapelle-Saint-Lazare

2013: Aix-en-Provence #71

Aix Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Sauveur d’Aix) in Aix-en-Provence in southern France is a Roman Catholic cathedral and the seat of the Archbishop of Aix.

It is built on the site of the 1st century Roman forum of Aix. Built and re-built from the 12th until the 19th century, it includes Romanesque, Gothic and Neo-Gothic elements, as well as Roman columns and parts of the baptistery from a 6th-century Christian church. It is a national monument of France.

According to the Christian tradition, the first church on the site was founded by Saint Maximinus of Aix, who arrived in Provence from Palestine with Mary Magdalene on a boat belonging to Lazarus. Maximin built a modest chapel on the site of the present cathedral and dedicated it to the Holy Saviour (le Saint Sauveur).

During the invasion of the Saracens in the 8th and 9th centuries, the original chapel of Saint-Sauveur was destroyed.

The building of the new church was interrupted by the Black Death and then the Hundred Years’ War. Work did not resume for 130 years, until 1472, when the last bay was built. The façade took another thirty years, and the last statues were not put in place until 1513, at the beginning of the Renaissance.

The doors of the cathedral were commissioned by the chapter in 1505, and were carved of walnut by the brothers Raymond and Jean Bolhit of Aix and by the Toulon sculptor Jean Guiramand.

The doors feature four figures in high relief of the major prophets of the Old Testament (Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel and Jeremiah).

Above the prophets are the figures of twelve Sybils, pagan fortune-tellers from antiquity, honoured by medieval Christian scholars for having forecast the birth, death and resurrection of Christ.

The figures are framed with garlands of pomegranates and acorns, bunches of grapes, symbols of the Eucharist, a lion, a dragon and other fantastic animals: an aspic (another type of dragon) and a basilisk, a cock with the tail of a snake, representing the battle between good and evil.

Aix-en-Provence; Provençal Occitan, or simply Aix (pronounced: "Ex", medieval Occitan Aics), is a city-commune in south of France, some 30 km (19 mi) north of Marseille.
It is in the region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, in the département of Bouches-du-Rhône, of which it is a subprefecture.
The population of Aix is approximately 143,000. Its inhabitants are called Aixois or, less commonly, Aquisextains.

Aix (Aquae Sextiae) was founded in 123 BC by the Roman consul Sextius Calvinus, who gave his name to its springs, following the destruction of the nearby Gallic oppidum at Entremont.

Aix, which during the Middle Ages was the capital of Provence, did not reach its zenith until after the 12th century, when, under the houses of Barcelona/Aragon and Anjou, it became an artistic centre and seat of learning.

Aix passed to the crown of France with the rest of Provence in 1487, and in 1501 Louis XII established there the parliament of Provence, which existed until 1789. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the town was the seat of the Intendance of Provence.

The local Aix dialect, rarely used and spoken by a rapidly decreasing number of people, is part of the provencal dialect of Occitan language. The provencal for "Aix-en-Provence" is "Ais de Prouvènço". Most of the older streets in Aix have names in both Provençal and French.

Aix is often referred to as the city of a thousand fountains. Among the most notable are the 17th-century Fontaine des Quatre Dauphins (Fountain of the Four Dolphins) in the Quartier Mazarin, designed by Jean-Claude Rambot, and three of the fountains down the central Cours Mirabeau: At the top, a 19th-century fountain depicts the "good king" René holding the Muscat grapes that he introduced to Provence in the 15th century; halfway down is a natural hot water fountain (34 °C), covered in moss, dating back to the Romans; and at the bottom at la Rotonde, the hub of modern Aix, stands a monumental fountain from 1860 beneath three giant statues representing art, justice and agriculture.
In the older part of Aix, there are also fountains of note in the Place d’Albertas and the Place des Trois-Ormeaux.

Unlike most of France which has an oceanic climate, Aix-en-Provence has a Mediterranean climate.

Wikipedia

This crazy evil building was found from Flickr by user dominotic . Original date: 2013-06-30 23:52:45

Tagged: , Aix-en-Provence , aix , france , fountain , water , market , open air market , Cathedral of the Holy Saviour , Cathédrale Saint Sauveur , Hôtel de Ville , Place de l’Hôtel de Ville , Saint-Jean-de-Malte , Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur , medieval , Cours Mirabeau , plane trees , roman city , south of france , city of a thousand fountains , Fontaine des Quatre Dauphins , la Rotonde , carvings , statue , niche , religious icon