Image from page 34 of “A half century of Minnesota as territory and state; a concise account of the principal events in the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement, and during the half century of territorial and state government” (1900)

Identifier: halfcenturyofmin01huds
Title: A half century of Minnesota as territory and state; a concise account of the principal events in the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement, and during the half century of territorial and state government
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Hudson, Horace B[ushnell] [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: [Minneapolis, Minn., The Minneapolis journal]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
e other end. On the evening 6f May2, 1878, the Washburn A flour mill in Min-neapolis^—the largest mill in the world atthat time—exploded with terrific force.The explosion was instantly followed bythat of two adjoining mills, while build-ings of all kinds in that part of the citywere wrecked by the conciisiioii. Tlie by the attempted robbery, in 1876, of abank in Northtield, the murder ot tiie cash-ier and the subsequent pursuit and captureof the outlaws. Two of the outlaws wereshot in the repulse of their band in thepublic square at Northfield and anotherwas killed while the gang was surroundedin a swamp by a pursuing posse. The oth-ers have since been prisoners in the Min-nesota penitentiary. The band hailed fromMissouri and the people of Minnesota weremost unwilling to liave their state brand-ed with the reputation which had attachedto the country of the James family. Prob-ably no event in its history so stirred Min-nesota to the maintenance of a high stand-,Trd of public firder

Text Appearing After Image:
MuuKllEAKi-om ;i pti()ti>i,rHpli owned l)y tht ruined mills and all others on the west sideof the river immediately took tire and werecompletely consumed. The loss of eighteenlives and the millions invested was not theleast of the evils of this catastrophe—froma commercial standpoint—for the mysteryof the explosion made it seem, at first, thatsafety in milling was an impossibility. Butthe mysteries of dust explosion were soonbetter understood and the Minneapolismills were rebuilt on a larger scale andwith appliances which assured their futuresafety from similar accident. The Northfield Tragedy. A most profound impression was madeupon the minds of the people of the state I) IN i»;i. Minnegotii Historical Soi-iety, Repudiation Repudiated. There was a feeling abrcirid that Minne-sota was a noble heritage and that hergood name should be as fair as her grandforests, blue lakes and broad prairies. Thepublic conscience had borne without awak-ening the stigma of repudiation since theb

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Found on Flickr (Internet Archive Book Images ) for this super evil building. Original date: 2014-07-29 03:24:17

Tagged: , bookid:halfcenturyofmin01huds , bookyear:1900 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Hudson__Horace_B_ushnell___from_old_catalog_ , bookpublisher:_Minneapolis__Minn___The_Minneapolis_journal_ , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:34 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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